Covid-19 pandemic and women’s vulnerabilities in Zimbabwe

Authors

  • Cowen Dziva Great Zimbabwe University
  • Idaishe Zhou Great Zimbabwe University
  • Ellen Farisayi Zvobgo Nehanda Centre for Gender and Cultural Studies, Great Zimbabwe University

Keywords:

intersectionality, feminism, pandemic, vulnerability, women

Abstract

While the Covid-19 pandemic affects the health and well-being of all, women and girls are disproportionately affected, especially in developing countries. Thus, the desk review sought to establish women’s vulnerabilities in face of the Covid-19 pandemic in Zimbabwe. The intersectional thinking was used to analyse and conclude the study. It emerged from the analysis that while the measures instituted to combat Covid-19 including calls for social distancing, quarantining and lockdowns remain key, they have disproportionately affected women’s socio-economic well-being exacerbating the long-standing gender inequalities. As shown by intersectional feminism, women and girls’ social identities overlap, and compound with pre-existing inequalities that subjugate them in society including patriarchy, culture, religion, and poverty to limit women’s community and personal security, access to employment and income, safety nets, and sexual and reproductive health. The study recommends gender mainstreaming in socio-economic response measures by state and non-state actors during, and after the Covid-19 pandemic.

Author Biographies

Idaishe Zhou, Great Zimbabwe University

Masters in Gender and Policy Studies Graduate, Nehanda Centre For Gender and Culturall Studies

Ellen Farisayi Zvobgo, Nehanda Centre for Gender and Cultural Studies, Great Zimbabwe University

Director of the Nehanda Centre for Gender and Cultural Studies, Great Zimbabwe University

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Published

2021-12-24

Issue

Section

Articles